Plug in and play

"As a huge Nintendo fan & longtime gamer, its amazing to be inside Tomodachi Life on #3DS as me. Game on!"

-

Christina Aguilera on Twitter, referring to her inclusion in Tomodachi Life as the first included celebrity Mii.

Now compare that sentiment with these screenshots Nintendo released of Ms. Aguilera:

image

BUY Tomodachi Collection games, upcoming releases
(via tinycartridge)

(via tinycartridge)

Source: twitter.com

tinycartridge:

In case you forgot this happened last night ⊟

It happened. It wasn’t a dream. Mega Man’s “Final Smash” move in the new Smash Bros. has the hero lined up with Volnutt, X, and other variations to deliver a light show.

And here are Mega Man’s moves that were shown off during yesterday’s Smash Direct. GIFs via Revengeance!

PREORDER Super Smash Bros for Wii U/3DS, upcoming releases
Source: revengeance

Source: geekstash

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{FINAL FANTASY VII SPOILERS BELOW}

In smash bros, it almost seems to be that all the characters are the same. Mario plays similar to Luigi, who plays similar to Kirby in some respects and pikachu in others, and Kirby plays similar to jiggly puff, (etc…). With this logic, many people immediately perceive themselves able to play virtually any character in the game, whether it be fast characters like Fox or Captain falcon (going by melee here) to slower characters like Ganondorf or bowser.

I use this as an introduction as I’ve seen a lot of people choose captain falcon over the years, and this choice almost always is never rational. It’s either seeing him as a character good to beat me with, or just having the novelty of the Falcon Punch. So the fight commences, and I take note of the same fighting style all novice players of captain falcon have:

"FALCON PUNCH!" "FALCON PUNCH!" "FALCON PUNCH!" "FALCON PUNCH!"

The falcon punch is awesome, but it loses its power when the player abuses it, considering the only button on the controller as the B button. Even worse, Captain Falcons famous attack is relatively easy to dodge, and even can cost the player their life in a counterattack of sorts.

I was thinking about this conundrum when I realized it parallels a trend in game design as well. Often companies pull these punches relatively quickly and too often, causing them to be not as effective as they would have been. Even worse, things such as a romance, a change in game style, or even the death of a character, are just thrust in, in some attempt to provide colour to the world they’ve made.

This “punching” cause the player to not feel the intended emotion, but usually arrive at a conclusion of confusion, as the game suddenly thrust in something that wasn’t needed, and could’ve been utilized better later.

The difference between what makes a good game company recognizable and respected for their craft is similar to what makes a good captain falcon player (not me by the way): the ability to wait, develop something, and then when the times right deliver it to the player, and unleash the full effect upon them.

{FINAL FANTASY VII SPOILERS BELOW}

Patience and timing are key. Think Aerith in FF VII. If we had little to know experience with her, and she was just shoehorned in only to die randomly, it would have no effect on the player. The reason it does is because of the timing, the atmosphere (I’ll discuss that later) but most of all Squares ability to have patience and then suddenly, when it’s most exposed, pierce the heart and twist the rusty knife. You feel more than you would have if she just suddenly died without warning.

This is the art of pacing, and allowing/allotting time between events, to ensure the maximum effect is achieved. Take time, and when the time is right, attack and strike when the iron is at it’s optimal temperature, and make something memorable and impactful out of it.

gamefreaksnz:

Banksy Flower by Naolito
US $10 for 24 hours only

gamefreaksnz:

Banksy Flower by Naolito

US $10 for 24 hours only

Source: bit.ly

Source: geekstash

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I recently spent the night at a friends house, playing video games for most of the night. Usually our choice of amusement is either regular matches of Halo (2 or 3) or them easily surpassing obstacles in the “hardest game ever”: Dark Souls. However at around 2:00 in the morning, there always is a period the common game separates. I need to sleep so I’ll be alert enough to drive home in the morning, one of my friends will be practically  bristling with energy playing games well after I pass out, and the last member of our group plays a more relaxing game, before he retires as well.

On this night in particular he had decided upon Bioshock 2, allowing me to get a glimpse into the sequel to a game I had recently played. He always recommended the sequel, half joking, yet with a twinge of anticipation I’d make the purchase one day. But I always had heard the sequel “bastardized” the goof name of Bioshock, and the setting of rapture sinking slowly into seas of consistency.

It wasn’t a bad game I suppose, but there were things that tipped me off to how the differences shone like sore thumbs. The splicers lost the “human”-ness about them, now deformed and twisted into vicious variations from one another. Sure, it allows them to be differentiated, but with time one could do the same with the originals homogeneous enemies. Hacking also changed, losing the puzzle minigame for the standard “press in button at the right time” kind of game. You also had a hacking “gun” emitting taser trails to an electronic enemy, where the “minigame” could occur.   

Falling into slumber I couldn’t put my finger on it, until I saw how he was playing. Whereas (in when I’d seen him play the original) he’d calculate a strategy, (albeit even if it was “lets think and catch a breath for a second) here he’d seem to run at a big daddy, only laying the odd trap bolt if it needed to be utilized.

He was playing faster.

The beauty of Bioshock was it’s ability to take it slow in my opinion. The story was allowed to flow nicely, even if one wasn’t fighting enemies at all times. The mood and theme would be established at these points as well, taking in the dystopia that is Rapture, as you almost at times seem to linger in its halls. It builds tension, and allows the player to remember more things about it when they look back fondly on the game.

Even now I’m recalling the eerie ambiance of rapture, the entrance as you see the whole city sprawled before you, or even Sander Cohen’s “masterpiece” and the arduous process it seemed to take to complete it.

But with Bioshock 2, those moments are lost in fast paced excitement, as he seemed to bound from room to room, taking almost no time at all to do much of anything. There was no meat in the middle, just two pieces of skin and air in between.

These periods of time between events need to exist. Sure, everyone wants those WOW moments, consistently throughout a game. But to make it truly memorable, you need the periods to allow yourself to digest all that’s been presented. Imagine if, in a movie, you learned who the bad guy was, but then he wasn’t the bad guy right away in the next scene. There’s no “what?” moment there. You’ve been cheated out of that moment, as you haven’t had your thoughts cement, and your brain relax. 

Bioshock is one of the few games that gets this right, as the plot consistently develops, and not once do you feel as though what you are doing is pointless (or at least I felt this way) yet still there are the moments where you walk along the underwater bridges between buildings, eyeing around corners for what may be there. A camera? A splicer? A big daddy? You take your time, allowing that tension to build, a plan to develop, and the reward to arrive as you finally rush in, and one of those WOW moments to occur.

I think Fallout 3 gets this right to an extent as well. Where things take time to get done. You take time to level up, progress, build your character, and have the story steadily progress along. You don’t leave the vault, then suddenly blow up megaton, and then have liberty prime show up. It’s a build up, and a pay off. The enemies take time to defeat, the locks take time to pick, and the people take longer to build trust with, but once you’ve done so, you get that reward, and the feeling of success afterward.

I mention sonic as his series is a game driven entirely by speed. You zip around the level, racing through each checkpoint, and arriving at the goal. But that’s not to say speed entirely is bad either. You need to keep pace going, but not to an insane rate. Sonic keeps a moderate pace, allowing the player to feel the rush of speed, but allowing a build up before a cool event takes place. 

Pace is what a game needs. The minigames need to take time. You shouldn’t be able to speed run a game by barely doing anything. It should take time to complete, and then a feeling of reward is achieved.

pxlbyte:

Bioshock Move Poster Mockup by Christoffer Ekstrom

pxlbyte:

Bioshock Move Poster Mockup by Christoffer Ekstrom

Source: pxlbyte

pxlbyte:

Bioshock Move Poster Mockup by Christoffer Ekstrom

pxlbyte:

Bioshock Move Poster Mockup by Christoffer Ekstrom

Source: pxlbyte

(via kartridges)

Source: masterstalfos